Top Five States to Watch Tonight

From left: former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

With just a few hours now separating us from the first election results, here are the five states I’m watching most closely tonight:

1.) North Carolina

Obviously, North Carolina is a key swing state in the presidential race, which is likely to be very close, but I’m even more interested in the results of the gubernatorial race between Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper.

We’ve been talking about this race for months. McCrory has been under fire from a coalition of radical progressives, corporate bullies, and special interests for his support for HB 2, a bill that stopped an effort in Charlotte to redefine gender and give grown men the right to shower and access changing areas with young girls in public facilities.

The fate of HB 2 — and our best line of defense in the progressive war on gender — rests completely on the results of this race.

2.) New Jersey

Rep. Scott Garrett (R-N.J.) is a strong conservative representative in New Jersey who came under fire for criticizing the NRCC for financially supporting Republican candidates who support same-sex marriage. Millions of dollars from outside special interest groups have since poured into New Jersey’s 5th congressional district to defeat Garrett in his race against special interest lobbyist Josh Gottheimer. With the NRCC declining to help Garrett at all, and with only a small coalition of conservatives refusing to abandon him, there’s no doubt he’s an underdog heading into tonight. Continue Reading

WATCH: Are These Abortion Attack Ads Hurting Russ Feingold?

A super PAC launched this ad at the end of September attacking former Wisconsin Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold for voting in favor of partial-birth abortion eight times:

Great news, given Republicans are so seldom willing to put the Democrats’ abortion extremism in front of voters.

The latest polling shows a big drop in support for Feingold — he’s lost 5 points since October 6th. Republican Ron Johnson is now within 3 points. Surely many factors are in play, but punching Feingold on late-term abortions clearly didn’t hurt.

Maggie Gallagher is a senior fellow at the American Principles Project and can be followed on Twitter @MaggieGallaghe. Continue Reading

Run, Marco, Run: Rubio Announces He Will Contend for Reelection

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) (photo credit: Gage Skidmore)

Marco Rubio is back.

Senator Rubio (R-Fla.) publicly announced his intention to run for reelection to the U.S. Senate this morning, saying that he’s “frustrated by what’s happening here in the Senate.”  Though his approval numbers were driven down during the months of the 2016 GOP presidential primary, Rubio is still considered to be the front runner in both the Florida Republican Senate primary and the general election.

His presumptive Democratic opponent, Representative Patrick Murphy, said today that “Marco Rubio abandoned the people of Florida. Unlike Rubio, I love working hard every single day for the people of Florida.” This notion of abandonment plagued Rubio during the presidential primary, likely accounting for his loss in his home state’s primary, which precipitated his withdrawal from that race.

For their part, Republicans in Congress seem united behind Rubio, once again viewing him as a bright star and a likely sure-thing in retaining his Senate seat. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee admitted that he had been pressuring Rubio daily to reverse his original decision to not run for reelection, and Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority Leader, has been heard on talk radio and elsewhere for weeks expressing his hope and optimism that his colleague would stay the course and run for a second term. This campaign of peer pressure, coupled with support from his family, appears to be the source of Rubio changing his mind on the issue, as indicated by a tweet this morning:

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Trump Hurts Down Ballot Races

Donald Trump (photo credit: Gage Skidmore)

Back in March, I wrote about an ad that targeted U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) because of his support of Donald Trump should he become the nominee. His Democrat opponent, Congresswoman Ann Kirkpatrick (D-AZ), released an ad called “Trump” that linked McCain to Trump.

It was brutal, but these types of ads practically write themselves if Donald Trump is at the top of the ticket. I wrote:

[McCain] didn’t make an endorsement, he just said he would vote for Trump.

Imagine ads like this running against any politician who backs Trump or says they will vote for Trump.

I don’t feel bad for candidates who endorse or openly back Trump, they made their bed so now they have to lay in it, but I am concerned about collateral damage.

In reality Republican candidates don’t even have to support Trump. Democrats, I’m sure, will find ways to inject Trump into races by playing sound bytes of Trump saying outrageous things. The ads write themselves. All they have to do is ask, “does my opponent believe what Trump believes?” Candidates will constantly be on the defensive.

All we have to do is look at what Trump’s opponents already are going through. He says something outrageous and the press go to the other candidates to get their reaction. A candidate’s campaign should be about their experience, record, ideas and convictions, not the asinine things that come out of Trump’s mouth or from his Twitter account on an almost daily basis.

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