After Obamacare Bombshell, Polls Show Trump Gaining

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore

In my post yesterday, I speculated that news of skyrocketing insurance premiums under Obamacare might spur a further surge in the polls for Donald Trump. The newest polling numbers being released now seem to confirm this.

On RealClearPolitics, the six national polls which were taken either during or after October 25th (the day after the Obamacare news broke) show Trump’s gap to Hillary Clinton down to 3.5 points in a two-way race. When expanded to a four-way race, seven polls show Clinton’s lead even smaller — only 3.1 points.

When the media focus is on Clinton and the Democrats, Trump is the clear beneficiary. The only question now is whether Trump can avoid drawing negative attention back to himself in the next 11 days.

Frank Cannon is the president of American Principles Project. Continue Reading

WATCH: The Three Best Moments from Trump’s EWTN Interview

Last night, EWTN aired an extended interview with Donald Trump, his first with the Catholic television network. Trump and host Raymond Arroyo covered a number of important topics, including life, religious liberty, Obamacare, and the importance of the 2016 election.

You can watch the full interview below:

Here were Trump’s top three moments from the interview:

1.) “The person who was pro-choice is now pro-life…and that had a big effect on me.”

Trump discussed his change in view on the pro-life question, describing an event with a couple close to him, including the baby they eventually had, and the effect that experience had on him:

ARROYO: You’re very concerned about the late-term abortions. What was the moment that changed your thinking, your heart, on this?

TRUMP: Well, there are a number of moments, but one was a couple that I know very, very well — and you had a strong pro-life [person] and you had a strong pro-choice [person], and they argued over [the pregnancy]. … The mother was pregnant. They argued over the child. One, I won’t get into specifics.

But one wanted to abort. And the other said, “We can’t do that. We’re not going to do that.” Anyway, they had the baby. It was a long time ago. And the baby is such a magnificent person, who I know, a magnificent person. And the person that was actually pro-choice is now pro-life because of it, and it had a big effect on me. But I’ve seen other examples similar to that; but I’ve seen other examples, so …

ARROYO: So, it was a personal change for you?

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Obamacare Was Designed to Fail — And It Is

President Barack Obama (photo via Wikimedia Commons)

Obamacare is bad deal for the young: the whole purpose of the plan was to rope young and healthy people into paying for insurance they don’t use, freeing up money to pay for us older, and generally wealthier, folks.

The net result of two years experience with Obamacare is that enrollments are not keeping pace with targets, leading to rising insurance losses, as The Wall Street Journal notes:

Recruitment for 2015 is roughly 70% of the original projection, but ObamaCare will be running at less than half its goal in 2016. HHS believes some 19 million Americans earn too much for Medicaid but qualify for ObamaCare subsidies and haven’t signed up. Some 8.5 million of that 19 million purchase off-exchange private coverage with their own money, while the other 10.5 million are still uninsured. In other words, for every person who’s allowed to join and has, two people haven’t.

Among this population of the uninsured, HHS reports that half are between the ages of 18 and 34 and nearly two-thirds are in excellent or very good health. The exchanges won’t survive actuarially unless they attract this prime demographic.

In Colorado, a measure to junk Obamacare for a single-payer ColoradoCare system appears headed for the ballot:

With Colorado’s shaky Obamacare exchange in peril, some health care advocates are calling for voters to scrap it and replace it with something far more ambitious.

Proponents of a statewide single-payer health care system have submitted 156,107 signatures, far more than the 98,492 required to qualify for the November 2016 ballot, to the Colorado secretary of state’s office for verification.

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