Ted Cruz’s Last Chance to Win

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) (photo credit: Gage Skidmore)
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) (photo credit: Gage Skidmore)

A number of extremely bright commentators have been busily pointing out how Ted Cruz could find his way to 1237 delegates  and the nomination. Or earn more, or nearly as many, delegates than Donald Trump and contest his way to the nomination, perhaps with Kasich as his VP nominee.

Or how the Convention could deadlock and be brokered to deliver the nomination to … just about anyone. In which case, as Trump demurely has pointed out: “I think you’d have riots.” (Unless, of course, Cleveland delivered the nomination to Ivanka Trump, clearly well qualified to be president and turning of Constitutional age comfortably a week before the general election. Ivanka would be a One Woman Unity ticket.)

The pundits’ analyses are correct as far as they go. That said they are missing a key point. They are missing the key point that has propelled Trump to dominance. The Washington Post‘s Dan Balz reported recently, “As one former member of Obama’s campaign team put it, ‘I feel like in some ways my brain has to think differently than it ever has.’”

Just so. Here’s the “differently.”

Donald Trump shrewdly has deployed the most powerful force in politics.  The most powerful force in politics is the power of Narrative, a dramatic story that appeals to the popular imagination.

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Read the full article at Forbes.com.

Ralph Benko, internationally published weekly columnist, co-author of The 21st Century Gold Standard, lead co-editor of the Gerald Malsbary translation from Latin to English of Copernicus’s Essay on Money, is American Principles Project’s Senior Advisor, Economics.