Dems Revert to Failed ‘War on Women’ Rhetoric

The War on Women rhetoric scared a lot of Republicans into silencing themselves on abortion for the last few years, but the meme tanked with voters in 2014.  Now, according to WaPo, the Democrats are bringing it back, thanks in part to Hillary Clinton’s tweets opposing GOP efforts to put Hyde Amendment language barring taxpayer-funded abortions into a bill to expand support for victims of sex trafficking:

At a press conference designed to protest the inclusion of the anti-abortion funding provision Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash) brandished the phrase like a shining sword: “It feels like every time we turn around and start making progress, whether it’s on passing a budget a couple of years ago or whether it’s today on trying to pass this trafficking bill, that women have to take a step backwards in order for the Republicans to accept us moving forward. I call that a war on women.”

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (photo credit: Marc Nozell via Flickr, CC BY 2.0)
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (photo credit: Marc Nozell via Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

Who exactly is waging a war on women here?

The language in the bill is the same as that for which every Democrat voted yes in the Judiciary Committee, and it is the Democrats whose desire to please Planned Parenthood appears to be overriding their commitment to helping women enslaved and trafficked to satisfy men’s crudest lust.

The human trafficking bill was not a political football until the Democrats decided to make it one.  Here’s a plea from one woman: Don’t let your passion for abortion undermine getting some women the help they need and punishing evildoers.

But with their unexpected victory (without lifting a finger) in frightening Renee Ellmers and other Republican women into blocking a vote on the 20-week abortion ban, Democrats are getting big eyes.  Their power to convince Republicans to avoid winning issues has real life consequences.

Carly Fiorina, here’s a chance to fight our war against Hillary for women everywhere.

Maggie Gallagher is editor of ThePulse2016.com.